Healthy Lobster Bisque

On Friday I referenced this recipe. Or, at least, I teased that there would be an awesome recipe to pair with those cheddar buttermilk biscuits. Hopefully lobster bisque was worth waiting for; especially a healthy one! I came across a recipe for Creamy Cauliflower Sauce from Pinch of Yum and it was perfect timing after we had just eaten a soup at a restaurant which was basically this sauce. I told K I could make it for him. He also requested a bisque. He did not care what kind, but said he wanted seafood in it. I did a little research to see what was involved for a bisque. There were lots of recipes that used cooked lobster meat, and I am sure they are fine, but if I am going to make a bisque, I wanted to do it fully. Lobster popped in my mind because of my goals, and I know that lobster is actually good for you.

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Immediately my mind went to wondering how I could combine the two recipes. Basically, instead of using heavy cream, I added cauliflower. You won’t taste the cauliflower at all, but you will feel the creaminess. Feel free to fatten it up with cream, but we were okay having a slightly less thick soup that was good for us. And, it tasted awesome! For my fellow Marylanders, K kept saying how it smelled like Old Bay, even though I didn’t use any in it. I wish I had sherry peppers to add to it like my parents would add to all seafood soups, but maybe next time?

The one amusing part was dealing with the lobster tails. Apparently they freak me out even though they are quite dead. I was holding them and they kept curling on themselves in a most creepy way. My husband took over lobster duty, but then proceeded to make them move just to make me extra scared (thanks, love you, too, K!). Anyway, they do look a bit scary, don’t they?

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Directions for Healthy Lobster Bisque

Adapted from Live Love Pasta and Pinch of Yum

  • 2 lobster tails (mine were about 1.5 pounds total)
  • Olive oil
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 3-4 celery stalks, chopped (about 1 cup)
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 14 oz can of tomatoes
  • 1 Tablespoon tomato paste
  • ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 bay leaf (chop or crumble it finely, otherwise be sure to pull it out before serving)
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme, or substitute fresh
  • 1 cauliflower head (any size, but at least two cups worth), chopped
  • ½ cup milk
  • Pepper and Salt

Bring enough water to a boil that will cover your cauliflower pieces. Add the cauliflower and cook for about 8-10 minutes until it is soft.

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Either use a blender or an immersion blender to blend the soup. Add the milk and a pinch of salt and pepper. Continue cooking a bit to thicken it, if necessary.

Meanwhile, prepare the lobster tails. Split them in half along their undersides. Steam them for about 10 minutes, or until cooked through. You want to steam them in a bowl so that you can save the water that cooks out of them.

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Allow the shells to cool, then remove the meat. Set the meat aside. Heat a small amount of olive oil in a large pot over medium heat.

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I added the tops of the celery stalks and then tossed them later.

Add the shells and saute for a few minutes. Then, add the wine, chicken broth, and the water saved from the lobster bowl.

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Cover and simmer for about 45 minutes. Discard the shells.

While the broth is simmering, saute the celery and shallots in a pan with a bit of olive oil and pepper.

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When the broth is ready, add them to the pot along with the tomatoes, tomato paste, red pepper flakes, bay leaf, and thyme.

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Simmer for an additional 30-45 minutes.

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During the last 10-15 minutes, add about 3-4 cups of the cauliflower mixture to thicken the bisque and make it creamy. Taste the soup and see if you need to add any salt or pepper. Meanwhile, chop the lobster meat into bite-sized pieces. Use an immersion blender (or a blender) to smooth the soup.

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Then, stir in the lobster meat before serving.

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Directions for Healthy Lobster Bisque (without pictures)

Adapted from Live Love Pasta and Pinch of Yum

  • 2 lobster tails (mine were about 1.5 pounds total)
  • Olive oil
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 3-4 celery stalks, chopped (about 1 cup)
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 14 oz can of tomatoes
  • 1 Tablespoon tomato paste
  • ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 bay leaf (chop or crumble it finely, otherwise be sure to pull it out before serving)
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme, or substitute fresh
  • 1 cauliflower head (any size, but at least two cups worth), chopped
  • ½ cup milk
  • Pepper and Salt

Bring enough water to a boil that will cover your cauliflower pieces. Add the cauliflower and cook for about 8-10 minutes until it is soft. Either use a blender or an immersion blender to blend the soup. Add the milk and a pinch of salt and pepper. Continue cooking a bit to thicken it, if necessary.

Meanwhile, prepare the lobster tails. Split them in half along their undersides. Steam them for about 10 minutes, or until cooked through. You want to steam them in a bowl so that you can save the water that cooks out of them.

Allow the shells to cool, then remove the meat. Set the meat aside. Heat a small amount of olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the shells and saute for a few minutes. Then, add the wine, chicken broth, and the water saved from the lobster bowl. Cover and simmer for about 45 minutes. Discard the shells.

While the broth is simmering, saute the celery and shallots in a pan with a bit of olive oil and pepper. When the broth is ready, add them to the pot along with the tomatoes, tomato paste, red pepper flakes, bay leaf, and thyme. Simmer for an additional 30-45 minutes. During the last 10-15 minutes, add about 3-4 cups of the cauliflower mixture to thicken the bisque and make it creamy. Taste the soup and see if you need to add any salt or pepper. Meanwhile, chop the lobster meat into bite-sized pieces. Use an immersion blender (or a blender) to smooth the soup. Then, stir in the lobster meat before serving.

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5 thoughts on “Healthy Lobster Bisque

  1. This looks wonderful! I love how you made it healthier and used cauliflower! I’ve been seeing a ton of that on TV – using cauliflower as a sub for creamy pasta sauces and such. I keep wondering if it’d be too lumpy and whether you’d clearly taste the cauliflower (though I actually love cauliflower so wouldn’t be a big problem for me). Glad to hear it works well.
    PS – I can’t keep up with all this good savory stuff I keep seeing everywhere! I keep buying all these groceries and stocking up my pantry and I feel a bit overwhelmed! : )

    • Thanks! The key would probably be making sure you blend it enough so that it isn’t lumpy. I didn’t have any difficulty with that. And now I have some ready and waiting in my freezer.

      I feel like I can’t keep up with recipes, too. There is always so much I want to make! Right now I’m trying to un-stock my pantry/freezer/etc. a bit, so it helps to find random new recipes. 🙂

  2. Pingback: Topic-Changing-Thursdays It’s Been 1 Year!? | fudgingahead

  3. Wow. Just wow. Before I can even attempt this though, I need help with wine. I tend to shy away from recipes that use wine because I have no idea what wine to cook with.

    Also, I have never heard of chopping up a bay leaf and leaving it in the dish! Is this something you do a lot?

    • We always buy the cheap wine, but not the “cooking” wine. It works well enough for us. The current brand we use is Bandit. As for the kind, we use chardonnay for white wine and cabernet sauvignon for red. You could certainly try those or a different one and mix it up.

      I do the bay leaf thing for us (I don’t think I would do it for a small child just to be super extra safe) partly because I hate fishing for the bay leaf at the end. I saw it somewhere else and realized that the major issue is the sharp edges, so if you can make them tiny, it shouldn’t matter. But, keeping them whole and removing them might be the best practice…I read up on it just now and it seems there are people who do both, but more people prefer to take it out just to be safe.

      Feel free to let me know if you have any other questions. 🙂

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