Herbed Yorkshire Pudding

I had saved this recipe to make and I wasn’t really sure what these would be like, but we ended up enjoying them. I was curious how they related to popovers and apparently are almost identical depending on your recipes. From what I could gather, this tends to be the savory version of a popover. But I’m sure I’m wrong on some level there, too. That was my best interpretation, in case you’ve made popovers before. I liked that I didn’t need a special pan or special ingredients. Everything was stuff I have on hand, and you could mix up the herbs.

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Breakfast Puff Pastry Packets

Today is a simple recipe that was inspired by some puff pastry recipes I found. I ended up doing my own using some Trader Joe’s dough I had stashed away. If you haven’t tried their puff pastry dough, you should. It’s only available around December, as far as I know, and not only is it a great price but it tastes really good because it is all butter like the DuFour kind. But for whatever reason, I like this one better and have had better luck with it. I didn’t realize it was a limited edition kind of product the first year, so the second year I stocked up!

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Whoopie Pies

One of the (many) things I had never made before was whoopie pies. I thought you needed a special pan, or fancy piping…and I didn’t know if they were really worth much effort, especially since recipes usually only make a few. I usually like a decent amount of effort to make desserts that would last us a week or so, just to make it more worthwhile. Otherwise, I’d rather make something more regular like cake/cookies/brownies. Well, I made these with the Fudgelet at his request. And they were worth it. Even worth needing to buy marshmallow fluff.

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Homemade Liege Waffles

I’ve made these a couple times and apparently both times forgot to take pictures. Whomp whomp. But maybe in the future when I make them next I can try to remember and add the pictures later. I do have the after shots, though.

These waffles were pretty amazing. They bake up crispy on the outside and eggy/chewy on the inside. I also kind of like that the shapes are not the typical round waffles.

As for the fancy pearl sugar usually required? I made a version with sugar and water. Unfortunately I forgot about them in the oven and they lost their shape, but I just broke them up into pieces again and they worked just fine in the dough. You can certainly buy the pearl sugar (Amazon has it, but there are grocery stores that carry it, too) or make it at home if you don’t feel like waiting.

Speaking of the dough, those are the little dough balls you make and then put in your waffle iron. I tried using extra dough but it didn’t work well. The waffles would take too long to cook through and the outside wasn’t as good. So, stick with the golf ball hunks of dough I describe in the directions.

These waffles don’t need syrup because they are sweet enough as is–the Fudgelet actually said that they taste like they have syrup in them. I hope you’ll try them!

Directions for Liege Waffles

Adapted from Something Swanky

  • 1 Tablespoon instant dry yeast
  • 1.5 Tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup milk, lukewarm (around 100-110 degrees F)
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) melted butter, slightly cooled
  • 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 3 cups flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 4 ounces pearl sugar (or 1/2 recipe of below)

Sprinkle the yeast and granulated sugar over the milk. Let rest 5 minutes, or until foamy. Whisk the eggs in a stand mixer for about 2 minutes on medium-low until lightly beaten. Add the milk mixture and mix. Then, with the mixer on low, slowly pour in the melted butter. Add the flour and salt, then switch to the dough attachment. Knead for a few minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary, until a ball of dough forms and it pulls away from the sides.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and allow to rise for about 1 hour until doubled. Alternatively, allow to rise slowly overnight in the refrigerator. When ready, preheat the waffle iron. Meanwhile, knead the pearl sugar into the dough then make golf ball-sized balls of dough. Cook one ball at a time until golden brown. For my waffle maker, this was about 3 minutes. Use forks to remove from the maker as the pearl sugar will caramelize and be super hot. You can keep the waffles warm in a 200 degree F oven on a baking sheet, if desired.

Hack for Pearl Sugar

  • 10 ounces Granulated sugar
  • water

Preheat the oven to 250 degrees F. Begin by grinding the granulated sugar in a mini food processor until it is more finely ground. Then add water and stir with your hands until it forms a dough. Then, make little balls of dough and place them on a parchment or silicone-lined baking sheet. Bake for about 1 hour until they turn crisp.

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Tips-y Tuesdays: Pie Crust by Hand

For some reason, I keep thinking I have this recipe shared on here. It is my current favorite pie crust recipe that has good luck each time I make it. Plus, I can make it without any tools. No fancy pictures today because if desired, you can check out more details at the Serious Eats site. This is just my summary for my reference, but you might like to see it, too.

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Baked French Toast (1 Hour)

Before the Chiplet, we definitely started doing brunch more often. K runs everyday, and he doesn’t eat before his workout so is ready for a nice breakfast in the late morning. The Fudgelet and I will eat breakfast before my workout (where he often joins me) and then are ready for lunch in the late morning. Since our breakfasts are usually simple, we are fine with anything for lunch from burgers to scrambled eggs.

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Cherry Pie

In case you wanted extra pie, I bring to you cherry pie. I made this for my Aunt L who came to visit Seattle (and us) for the first time ever. She came in the Fall around her birthday, so I wanted to make her favorite dessert. Of course it was something I had never made before, and it is an area I struggle with: pie! Thankfully, I was able to make something that was acceptable, and I think even delicious.

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