Quiche with Bacon, Feta, and Spinach

Even though I had a little oops moment with the filling for this quiche, it was still a delicious quiche that I will make again. There was something about the salty, creaminess of the feta that really made me love it.

This is the new one versus the one below is the original.

As you can see from these pictures, I had a bit too much filling for my pan. Next time I will just leave some of the custard mixture out and maybe bake it in a ramekin.
 
Update from Future Aly: I remade this in a springform pan with modified recipe amounts and it turned out better. But, it definitely took much longer to bake. However, I really enjoyed it, as did the family.
Directions for Quiche with Bacon, Feta, and Spinach
Adapted from David Lebovitz

Tart dough

  • 1.75 cups flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 8 Tablespoons butter, cubed and chilled
  • 8-10 Tablespoons ice water
Using a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, your hands, or a food processor mix together the flour, sugar, and salt. Add the butter on medium speed/pulsing to cut it into the dry ingredients until the butter pieces are the size of peas. Add the ice water and mix until the dough comes together (I had to add a bit more water). Shape into a disk with your hands, wrap in plastic, and chill for at least 30 minutes (up to 3 days).
Roll the dough into a circle until it is about 13 inches in diameter, if using a 10-inch tart mold or 9 inch springform pan. Brush off excess flour and transfer the dough to the mold. You can use a rolling pin along the edges of the pan to remove the excess dough. Chill the tart until ready to use.

Quiche Filling

  • 7-8 slices bacon
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onion
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 10 ounces baby spinach
  • 1.75 cups milk
  • 7 eggs, room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup minced chives
  • 3 Tablespoons chopped basil
  • Pinch of paprika
  • 6 ounces feta cheese
  • About 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Begin by cooking the bacon in a large pan until not crispy but cooked through. Chop the bacon once it is cool and set it aside. Remove excess oil from the pan, then cook the onion until softened. Add the spinach with some salt and pepper. When the spinach is softened, turn off the heat.

Meanwhile, whisk together the milk, eggs, mustard, salt, chives, basil, and paprika.

Put the bacon pieces in the bottom of the tart shell. Add the spinach/onion mixture next. Crumble the feta on top. Pour the milk mixture on top to make sure it is evenly spread, but if you have extra milk mixture as it gets to the top, don’t try to fit it in. Sprinkle the Parmesan on top, then bake until set (about 20-30 minutes).

(oops)

Let it cool for a few minutes before slicing it.
Directions for Quiche with Bacon, Feta, and Spinach (without pictures)
Adapted from David Lebovitz

Tart dough

  • 1.75 cups flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 8 Tablespoons butter, cubed and chilled
  • 8-10 Tablespoons ice water
Using a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, your hands, or a food processor mix together the flour, sugar, and salt. Add the butter on medium speed/pulsing to cut it into the dry ingredients until the butter pieces are the size of peas. Add the ice water and mix until the dough comes together (I had to add a bit more water). Shape into a disk with your hands, wrap in plastic, and chill for at least 30 minutes (up to 3 days).
Roll the dough into a circle until it is about 13 inches in diameter, if using a 10-inch tart mold or 9 inch springform pan. Brush off excess flour and transfer the dough to the mold. You can use a rolling pin along the edges of the pan to remove the excess dough. Chill the tart until ready to use.
Quiche Filling
  • 7-8 slices bacon
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onion
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 10 ounces baby spinach
  • 1.75 cups milk
  • 7 eggs, room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup minced chives
  • 3 Tablespoons chopped basil
  • Pinch of paprika
  • 6 ounces feta cheese
  • About 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Begin by cooking the bacon in a large pan until not crispy but cooked through. Chop the bacon once it is cool and set it aside. Remove excess oil from the pan, then cook the onion until softened. Add the spinach with some salt and pepper. When the spinach is softened, turn off the heat.

Meanwhile, whisk together the milk, eggs, mustard, salt, chives, basil, and paprika.

Put the bacon pieces in the bottom of the tart shell. Add the spinach/onion mixture next. Crumble the feta on top. Pour the milk mixture on top to make sure it is evenly spread, but if you have extra milk mixture as it gets to the top, don’t try to fit it in. Sprinkle the Parmesan on top, then bake until set (about 45-60 minutes). Let it cool for a few minutes before slicing it.

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