Making Dashi and Ramen Eggs

Look at me, I am sharing a recipe, and it is something out of my comfort zone! Let me start by saying I had some difficulty with dashi. Initially, I was going to buy dashi, but I couldn’t find one that wasn’t listing MSG as a first or second ingredient. I even went to an Asian store where I can usually find what we need. So, I decided to make it. But then I had a little issue of finding the ingredients for it. I think what I made was ok, at least for us.

The smell from making the dashi was a bit overwhelming for me. It didn’t seem to bother the rest of the household, so maybe it is just my pregnant nose being more sensitive. I am happy that I was able to make one large batch and freeze for future ramen egg batches.

Directions for Making Dashi and Ramen Eggs

Adapted from Serious Eats and I Am A Food Blog

Dashi

  • 30 g kombu (dried kelp sheets)
  • 30 g bonito flakes (I had to substitute a mix of flakes with other seasoning)
  • 2 quarts water

Put the kombu and water in a large pot and bring to a simmer.

When it reaches a simmer, remove from the heat, add the flakes, then let it stand for 5 minutes.

Line a fine mesh strainer with paper towels and drain the broth. This makes more than you need, so freeze it in batches and set aside 3/4 cup of it for the eggs.

Ramen Eggs

  • 6 eggs (in the refrigerator)
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 2 Tablespoons mirin
  • 2 Tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 1.5 teaspoons sugar

Prepare an ice bath. Bring a pot of water to a boil, then gently lower the eggs into the water (a slotted spoon is handy here). Adding the eggs from the refrigerator will drop the water to a simmer. Simmer for 9 minutes if you want them to look like mine. Add more or less time depending on how you want your eggs. Remove the eggs and immediately put them in the ice bath. Peel the eggs.

Meanwhile, mix together the dashi, soy sauce, mirin, rice vinegar, and sugar in a medium bowl. When the eggs are ready, place them in the dashi mixture and cover. Marinate for at least one hour in the refrigerator. To get them mildly flavored, an hour or two is fine. The ones we left in the mixture for a couple days had a much stronger flavor closer to what I’ve had at ramen restaurants.

To best enjoy the eggs, putting them in a noodle soup (warming them up in the soup broth first) to eat is recommended. To make our noodle soup, I cooked rice noodles in one pot, then rinsed them and divided them into our soup bowls. Then I brought some chicken broth to a boil (or beef), added chopped green onion (the white parts) and some cilantro, then cooked a vegetable (such as choy sum) in the broth. When the veggie is done, I divided the vegetables into the bowls, then warmed the eggs in the broth.

Finally, I divided the (cooked) meat we were using (roast beef one night, chicken another) into the soup bowls, along with the green parts of the green onions, more cilantro, and the eggs and broth. You can add more seasoning if desired.

Directions for Making Dashi and Ramen Eggs (without pictures)

Adapted from Serious Eats and I Am A Food Blog

Dashi

  • 30 g kombu (dried kelp sheets)
  • 30 g bonito flakes (I had to substitute a mix of flakes with other seasoning)
  • 2 quarts water

Put the kombu and water in a large pot and bring to a simmer. When it reaches a simmer, remove from the heat, add the flakes, then let it stand for 5 minutes. Line a fine mesh strainer with paper towels and drain the broth. This makes more than you need, so freeze it in batches and set aside 3/4 cup of it for the eggs.

Ramen Eggs

  • 6 eggs (in the refrigerator)
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 2 Tablespoons mirin
  • 2 Tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 1.5 teaspoons sugar

Prepare an ice bath. Bring a pot of water to a boil, then gently lower the eggs into the water (a slotted spoon is handy here). Adding the eggs from the refrigerator will drop the water to a simmer. Simmer for 9 minutes if you want them to look like mine. Add more or less time depending on how you want your eggs. Remove the eggs and immediately put them in the ice bath. Peel the eggs.

Meanwhile, mix together the dashi, soy sauce, mirin, rice vinegar, and sugar in a medium bowl. When the eggs are ready, place them in the dashi mixture and cover. Marinate for at least one hour in the refrigerator. To get them mildly flavored, an hour or two is fine. The ones we left in the mixture for a couple days had a much stronger flavor closer to what I’ve had at ramen restaurants.

To best enjoy the eggs, putting them in a noodle soup (warming them up in the soup broth first) to eat is recommended. To make our noodle soup, I cooked rice noodles in one pot, then rinsed them and divided them into our soup bowls. Then I brought some chicken broth to a boil (or beef), added chopped green onion (the white parts) and some cilantro, then cooked a vegetable (such as choy sum) in the broth. When the veggie is done, I divided the vegetables into the bowls, then warmed the eggs in the broth. Finally, I divided the (cooked) meat we were using (roast beef one night, chicken another) into the soup bowls, along with the green parts of the green onions, more cilantro, and the eggs and broth. You can add more seasoning if desired.

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