Lactation Chocolate Chip Cookies

A friend recently had her baby and was worried about her milk supply. So yeah, when I said lactation in the title, I meant….lactating moms. Does lactating sound odd to you? It does to me, but I think because the term isn’t used all over the place as often as “breastfeeding” or “nursing”. Lactating makes me feel more like a cow. When a (different) friend commented how I am still lactating, I was all “whooooaaa….oh yeah, I guess so, haha.” And I guess there is the whole idea that you might even be lactating but not breastfeeding. So, maybe these should be called Breastfeeding Chocolate Chip Cookies? Anyhoo, the friend with the baby (who also has a toddler) was going to make herself some cookies. I volunteered, and she still said “I think I might have some time, and I have the supplies”. After I pushed a bit more, she willingly let me make them for her, since I have half the number of kids she does, so therefore triple the amount of free time. And baking is one of my “things”, so it was nice to be able to help out with a hobby. She sent her husband over with the Brewer’s yeast and flaxseed (who then handed them over to K at the door since I was putting the Fudgelet down for bed, which felt like a drug deal, haha), and gave me a recipe she used previously. I changed the recipe a bunch, partly because the original one wasn’t super clear with the directions. Also, I ended up making two batches, so I changed the ratios a bit the second time since I now knew how the cookies would turn out.

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I can’t really say if these work for sure. You really can’t with any tips for helping with milk supply when you are breastfeeding. When I struggled at the beginning with the Fudgelet, I drank a ton of water, did a whole regimen with pumping/nursing 24/7, ate granola (oats) throughout the day, tried Mother’s Milk Tea…who knows if it was any of that, or just time? But, as it is with many health issues, the placebo effect can be helpful, too. So, if you want to try Brewer’s yeast, flax seed, and oats to help with your supply (or your friend’s), then this is a recipe that includes those ingredients and is actually tasty! I had to try one because it didn’t look too appealing during the making process, but they were nice chewy cookies that almost have an oatmeal raisin vibe, balanced with lots of chocolate chips.

Directions for Lactation Chocolate Chip Cookies

  • 4 Tablespoons water
  • 2 Tablespoons ground flaxseed/flaxseed meal
  • 14-16 Tablespoons butter, room temperature (I used anything in that range and was happy. You could potentially even cut the butter a smidge more)
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup brown sugar (light or dark)
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 Tablespoons Brewer’s yeast
  • 3 cups old-fashioned oats
  • 1.5 cups chocolate chips

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees and prepare baking sheets. In a small bowl, stir together the water and flaxseed. Leave for a few minutes while you continue with the next step.

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With the paddle attachment on your mixer at medium speed, cream together the butter and both sugars. After a few minutes it will be light and fluffy.

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Beat in the eggs, one at a time, beating for one minute after each. Then, add the vanilla and flaxseed mixture. Beat for another minute until smooth.

While beating, in a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, salt, and Brewer’s yeast. Add the dry mixture to the mixing bowl on low speed. Beat until not quite combined, then add the oats. After the oats are well-combined, stir in the chocolate chips.

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Scoop out the cookies onto the baking sheets. They will spread a bit, depending on how warm your butter is. Using a medium (Tablespoon-sized) scoop will yield about 4 dozen cookies.

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Bake the cookies for about 10-15 minutes until lightly browned. Allow to cool for a few minutes before removing them from the baking sheet.

Directions for Lactation Chocolate Chip Cookies (without pictures)

  • 4 Tablespoons water
  • 2 Tablespoons ground flaxseed/flaxseed meal
  • 14-16 Tablespoons butter, room temperature (I used anything in that range and was happy. You could potentially even cut the butter a smidge more)
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup brown sugar (light or dark)
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 Tablespoons Brewer’s yeast
  • 3 cups old-fashioned oats
  • 1.5 cups chocolate chips

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees and prepare baking sheets. In a small bowl, stir together the water and flaxseed. Leave for a few minutes while you continue with the next step.

With the paddle attachment on your mixer at medium speed, cream together the butter and both sugars. After a few minutes it will be light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, beating for one minute after each. Then, add the vanilla and flaxseed mixture. Beat for another minute until smooth.

While beating, in a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, salt, and Brewer’s yeast. Add the dry mixture to the mixing bowl on low speed. Beat until not quite combined, then add the oats. After the oats are well-combined, stir in the chocolate chips.

Scoop out the cookies onto the baking sheets. They will spread a bit, depending on how warm your butter is. Using a medium (Tablespoon-sized) scoop will yield about 4 dozen cookies. Bake the cookies for about 10-15 minutes until lightly browned. Allow to cool for a few minutes before removing them from the baking sheet.

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