Overnight Yeasted Waffles

Last year, my friends and I went to a big Mom/Baby Halloween party. This year, most of us weren’t attending the party because it was so crazy last year (lots of people, overheating babies in their costumes, meltdowns galore…). As it turned out, the Fudgelet ended up taking an epic nap (for him) that day, so we would have missed most of it anyway. Besides, K’s work had a trick-or-treating event the same afternoon, so we went to that one instead. (Had to show off the matching family costumes, after all.)

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Anyway, I decided to invite the girls (and kids) over for a “Boo Breakfast” the day before Halloween. Mornings generally work well for most of us since our toddlers nap in the afternoon. And, if I’m going to be up early anyway, I may as well make some food. I had found this recipe awhile back and kept wanting to make it. The problem with overnight recipes? You have to remember to start them the day before–haha! Each time I would remember, it was too late since I generally do earlier breakfasts, and you needed the batter to rest for at least 12 hours. I actually preferred the dough that was closer to 24 hours. And, that’s easier because you can prep it after breakfast for the next day’s breakfast. Easier to remember!

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I did a single batch to test it out with K, and then did a double batch for the girls. I added fruit in with the girls’ waffles, and those were tasty. This recipe is pretty simple, but you do need to prepare–obviously starting it the day before, but also allowing time for the butter/milk to cool down in the beginning of the recipe. The day of? Super easy. Whisk it one more time, then make the waffles. That’s it.

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Fun side note? Try to explain Log Cabin syrup versus maple syrup to a Canadian who has only heard of maple syrup. 🙂

Directions for Overnight Yeasted Waffles

Slightly adapted from Cook’s Illustrated Baking Book

  • 1.75 cups milk
  • 8 Tablespoons butter
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 Tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 1.5 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
  • Frozen raspberries or blueberries (optional)

Heat the milk and butter in a small saucepan until the butter is melted (a few minutes). Let it cool until warm to the touch (around 110 degrees F). This will take awhile, so start this well before the rest of the steps.

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Then, whisk the flour, cinnamon, sugar, yeast, and salt together in a large bowl.

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Whisk the milk mixture into it until smooth. Then, whisk in the eggs and vanilla.

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Scrape down the bowl with a spatula, then cover it with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 12-24 hours. The mixture will double while it chills.

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When ready to make the waffles, preheat the oven to 200 degrees. Place a wire cooling rack in a baking sheet. Preheat your waffle iron, then whisk the batter.

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If adding fruit, stir it in gently now. You can add as much as you like. Smaller fruits like wild blueberries and raspberries work best. You could also chop the fruit.

For a Belgian waffle pan, about 1/3 to 1/2 cup batter per waffle makes about 6 waffles from this batter. You can easily double the batter, too. When the waffles are done cooking, place them on the baking sheet in the oven to stay warm and crisp slightly.

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Directions for Overnight Yeasted Waffles (without pictures)

Slightly adapted from Cook’s Illustrated Baking Book

  • 1.75 cups milk
  • 8 Tablespoons butter
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 Tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 1.5 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
  • Frozen raspberries or blueberries (optional)

Heat the milk and butter in a small saucepan until the butter is melted (a few minutes). Let it cool until warm to the touch (around 110 degrees F). This will take awhile, so start this well before the rest of the steps.

Then, whisk the flour, cinnamon, sugar, yeast, and salt together in a large bowl. Whisk the milk mixture into it until smooth. Then, whisk in the eggs and vanilla. Scrape down the bowl with a spatula, then cover it with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 12-24 hours. The mixture will double while it chills.

When ready to make the waffles, preheat the oven to 200 degrees. Place a wire cooling rack in a baking sheet. Preheat your waffle iron, then whisk the batter. If adding fruit, stir it in gently now. You can add as much as you like. Smaller fruits like wild blueberries and raspberries work best. You could also chop the fruit.

For a Belgian waffle pan, about 1/3 to 1/2 cup batter per waffle makes about 6 waffles from this batter. You can easily double the batter, too. When the waffles are done cooking, place them on the baking sheet in the oven to stay warm and crisp slightly.

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3 thoughts on “Overnight Yeasted Waffles

  1. This Canadian has no clue what log cabin syrup is. Cedar juice because log cabins are made of cedar? Can you juice a cedar? Your waffles look tasty!

    • Hahaha! I thought you would appreciate that. Syrup here includes maple syrup, but also a whole range of fake ones that are designed to taste “better”…basically, if you grow up with a certain brand, it tends to become your favorite. Some taste buttery, and most are super sweet. Log Cabin is my husband’s favorite brand.

  2. Pingback: Mixed Bag Mondays: Mushrooms and Waffles | fudgingahead

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