Learning to Cook for Three Part 4: Singapore Noodles

K sent me this recipe and asked if we could make it sometime. I said we could make it the next day, thinking we had all of the ingredients. Apparently I thought we still had some green onions. Oops. Well, the pictures don’t include them, but we added them to the leftovers and it was so much better. So definitely don’t leave them out. Most nights, K has been taking care of dinner. I try to make it easy and either make most of the food ahead, prep ingredients, etc. Meanwhile, I am upstairs with the Fudgelet trying to convince him it’s bedtime and not playtime. Anyway, this was a recipe that was still in K’s comfort zone, but stepped up a notch. It meant that he could try something new but not feel frazzled. I was impressed because there are many steps to follow, and it turned out delicious!

IMG_1766

There is prep work involved, with marinating the beef and chopping some ingredients. But, that is typical for Asian cooking. It did make a large amount of food, which is handy for us. K has become such a fan of leftovers, which is a full 180 from his opinion when we were dating. I still try to make sure we have a few new meals each week, and if there are still lots of leftovers, I freeze some. Often the week is front-loaded with new food because if I have time, I make something. I always worry that if I don’t take advantage, there will be a day later in the week when I won’t be able to cook something. I’ve also been trying to maintain variety. Often, I think of pasta meals but not anything else. Or, I want to make all of the chicken recipes and forget about other proteins.

IMG_1764

While I was waiting for the Fudgelet to fall asleep, I daydreamed about when he goes to school and I can make food during the day, not worrying about naps/loud sounds/etc. It was such a wonderful daydream. Not that I want him to get older sooner, just that while I’m missing him at school, it will be nice to resume some selfish past-times.

Directions for Singapore Noodles

Slightly adapted from America’s Test Kitchen

Beef

  • 3/4 pound flank steak, sliced thinly
  • 1 Tablespoon soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons mirin
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar
  • 1.5 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon white pepper

Mix all of the above in a bowl and marinate for at least 6 hours or overnight.

IMG_1753

Rest of Recipe

  • Marinated beef from above
  • Oil
  • 3 Tablespoons curry powder
  • 8 ounces rice vermicelli
  • 3 Tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 5 eggs, lightly beaten
  • Salt
  • 1 Tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1.5 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
  • 1 red bell pepper, seeded and sliced thinly
  • 2 large shallots, sliced thinly
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 4 green onions, chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon lime juice

In a large skillet, heat 1/4 cup oil with the curry powder over medium-low heat until fragrant (a few minutes).

IMG_1754

Remove from the skillet. Follow the directions on the package of rice vermicelli to cook them, but do not cook them until soft, just flexible. Drain them, then cut the noodles into thirds. Place them in a bowl and add the curry/oil, soy sauce, and sugar. Toss until combined.

IMG_1761

Heat some oil in the skillet, then brown the beef on both sides, then continue cooking until cooked through.

IMG_1756

Push to the side of the pan, then add the eggs with a pinch of salt.

IMG_1757

Stir them until set, but wet. Then, stir the eggs into the beef, continuing to cook and break up large pieces of egg.

IMG_1758

When the egg is cooked, remove everything from the skillet and set aside.

IMG_1760

In a bit of oil, saute the garlic and ginger for 30 seconds. Add the bell pepper and shallots. After 2-3 minutes when they are still crispy, but have softened, add them to the bowl with the egg/beef.

IMG_1763

On medium-high heat, bring the broth to a simmer.

IMG_1759

Add the rice vermicelli, stirring frequently, until all of the broth is absorbed.

IMG_1762

Toss to combine with the beef/egg mixture, then stir in the green onions and lime juice.

IMG_1765

Directions for Singapore Noodles (without pictures)

Slightly adapted from America’s Test Kitchen

Beef

  • 3/4 pound flank steak, sliced thinly
  • 1 Tablespoon soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons mirin
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar
  • 1.5 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon white pepper

Mix all of the above in a bowl and marinate for at least 6 hours or overnight.

Rest of Recipe

  • Marinated beef from above
  • Oil
  • 3 Tablespoons curry powder
  • 8 ounces rice vermicelli
  • 3 Tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 5 eggs, lightly beaten
  • Salt
  • 1 Tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1.5 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
  • 1 red bell pepper, seeded and sliced thinly
  • 2 large shallots, sliced thinly
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 4 green onions, chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon lime juice

In a large skillet, heat 1/4 cup oil with the curry powder over medium-low heat until fragrant (a few minutes). Remove from the skillet. Follow the directions on the package of rice vermicelli to cook them, but do not cook them until soft, just flexible. Drain them, then cut the noodles into thirds. Place them in a bowl and add the curry/oil, soy sauce, and sugar. Toss until combined.

Heat some oil in the skillet, then brown the beef on both sides, then continue cooking until cooked through. Push to the side of the pan, then add the eggs with a pinch of salt. Stir them until set, but wet. Then, stir the eggs into the beef, continuing to cook and break up large pieces of egg. When the egg is cooked, remove everything from the skillet and set aside.

In a bit of oil, saute the garlic and ginger for 30 seconds. Add the bell pepper and shallots. After 2-3 minutes when they are still crispy, but have softened, add them to the bowl with the egg/beef.

On medium-high heat, bring the broth to a simmer. Add the rice vermicelli, stirring frequently, until all of the broth is absorbed. Toss to combine with the beef/egg mixture, then stir in the green onions and lime juice.

Advertisements

Share Your Thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s