Potato Bread

You have no idea how happy I was that a full on bread recipe turned out so well for me. I have made some breads before, but this one seemed legit (maybe because I have only ever bought potato bread from a store before). I figured you could make it at home, but I didn’t realize how simple it was. A little while ago I was up early waiting for our new kitchen table to be delivered. I had nothing to do because I couldn’t go anywhere or get too involved. I figured it was the perfect time to make bread since most of the time is inactive for allowing it to rise. The other reason I wanted to try this recipe was because it is my friend Lisa’s favorite bread. She had stayed the night and I wanted to surprise her with it in the morning. I tried to play it off like it was no big deal, but I guess the cat is out of the bag…I was really excited to serve it for her. And, yeah, I knew K would like it, too.

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Part of the reason I chose this recipe was that it did not involve a baking stone. I had one previously but I don’t know what was wrong with it. I would use it and while it was in the oven it would release this really strong odor (almost chemical-like). I also never liked the results from it. Since then, I haven’t bought a new friend. Another friend gave me a gift card with the intention of having me use it to buy a baking stone…but I bought other baking supplies instead. Oops. Hehe.

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The ingredients are also simple. You probably have all of them on hand. The only special ingredient is the potato.

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This is also my chance to show off my new kitchen table a bit. Ooooo. Ahhhh.

 

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Directions for Potato Bread

Makes 1 loaf

Slightly adapted from Taste of Home

  • 1 small potato (gold or white), diced (you can remove the peel after boiling or now)
  • 1/4 ounce active dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1/2 cup warm milk
  • 1 Tablespoon butter, softened
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3-4 cups all-purpose flour

Place the potato in a medium saucepan with enough water to cover the top of the potato. Bring to a boil, then simmer for about 10-15 minutes until tender.

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Drain, reserving 1/4 cup of the liquid. Mash the potatoes and set aside.

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I had a big potato, so I only added about the amount you see on the spoon.

In your mixing bowl, dissolve the yeast in warm water.

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Add the milk, butter, sugar, salt, 2 cups of flour, mashed potatoes, and reserved cooking liquid.

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Beat until smooth (a couple minutes). Stir in just enough flour to form a stiff, but slightly sticky dough. Continue to knead in the mixer for a few minutes on medium-low.

Remove from the bowl to knead by hand for a few minutes. Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease the top. Cover with clear wrap and let rise until doubled, about 45 minutes.

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Punch the dough down, then place in a greased 9 in. by 5 in. loaf pan. Cover with the clear wrap again, and let it rise until doubled (about 15-30 minutes).

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Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Feel free to have a broiler pan or other pan on the bottom rack of the oven to create a steam pan. If using the steam pan, when you place the bread in the oven, pour some water into the pan then close the door.

Sprinkle some flour on top of the bread after removing the clear wrap.

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Bake the bread for about 15 minutes at 400 degrees, then reduce the temperature to 375 degrees and continue baking until the top is golden brown. The internal temperature should read about 200 degrees for the bread. Remove from the pan immediately, and allow it to cool completely on a wire rack before slicing.

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Directions for Potato Bread (without pictures)

Makes 1 loaf

Slightly adapted from Taste of Home

  • 1 small potato (gold or white), diced (you can remove the peel after boiling or now)
  • 1/4 ounce active dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1/2 cup warm milk
  • 1 Tablespoon butter, softened
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3-4 cups all-purpose flour

Place the potato in a medium saucepan with enough water to cover the top of the potato. Bring to a boil, then simmer for about 10-15 minutes until tender. Drain, reserving 1/4 cup of the liquid. Mash the potatoes and set aside.

In your mixing bowl, dissolve the yeast in warm water. Add the milk, butter, sugar, salt, 2 cups of flour, mashed potatoes, and reserved cooking liquid. Beat until smooth (a couple minutes). Stir in just enough flour to form a stiff, but slightly sticky dough. Continue to knead in the mixer for a few minutes on medium-low.

Remove from the bowl to knead by hand for a few minutes. Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease the top. Cover with clear wrap and let rise until doubled, about 45 minutes.

Punch the dough down, then place in a greased 9 in. by 5 in. loaf pan. Cover with the clear wrap again, and let it rise until doubled (about 15-30 minutes). Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Feel free to have a broiler pan or other pan on the bottom rack of the oven to create a steam pan. If using the steam pan, when you place the bread in the oven, pour some water into the pan then close the door.

Sprinkle some flour on top of the bread after removing the clear wrap. Bake the bread for about 15 minutes at 400 degrees, then reduce the temperature to 375 degrees and continue baking until the top is golden brown. The internal temperature should read about 200 degrees for the bread. Remove from the pan immediately, and allow it to cool completely on a wire rack before slicing.

 

 

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6 thoughts on “Potato Bread

  1. This bread was so perfect, and it was so sweet of you to make it knowing my history with it!! I just wish my stomach was equipped at the time for it 😉 You really got every single part of it down pat – I loved how the crust was just right (like we were talking about sometimes they’re too crusty at a certain bakery). And it made a freaking excellent egg sandwich!! Thanks so much for sharing this one! Drooling now to think about it… *_*

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