Oatmeal Fudge Bars

I think it’s pretty obvious to people who know me that I absolutely love chocolate. Last year when I was trying to lose a little weight I managed to go without it for a few days. The first day wasn’t a big deal, but boy was that second day horrible! After that, I was fine. I then gradually added treats back in. Of course, I’m back in almost full form. I made a chocolate chunk pie a little while ago (recipe coming soon) and I kept going back for more. I was almost relieved when it was finally gone so I wouldn’t be tempted by it anymore! When I made this I made sure to take 3/4 of it to work.

There is something about chocolate and oats that is a good combination. My friend Lisa made these bars with white chocolate and I loved them, even though I’m not always a white chocolate fan. So, feel free to make it with whatever chocolate you prefer. I was thinking I might even try two layers one time–one white, one chocolate–to see how it turns out. We each have a copy of the magazine this recipe came from (Cook’s Country Chocolate Desserts). I haven’t made anything else from it yet because it feels like I am getting a new cookbook each week I have to try! But, it definitely has some good-sounding recipes.

Be forewarned–the crust has to cool for an hour before you continue, so leave time for that! For the chocolate, you can use semi-sweet or darker. If you use white chocolate, I would leave out the coffee powder and maybe add another flavoring instead, like vanilla.

Oatmeal Fudge Bars

Crust/Topping

  • 1 cup oats (quick-cooking or old-fashioned) (3 oz)
  • 1 cup packed light brown sugar (7 oz)
  • 3/4 cup flour (3.75 oz)
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 8 tablespoons butter, melted and cooled

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Line 8-inch square baking pan with foil and grease it.

A tip for the pan–turn it upside down and put the foil over that to get the right shape. Then, when you turn it over, you just have to make a few adjustments!

Whisk everything but the butter together in a bowl. Stir in the melted butter until combined.

Weighing the dry ingredients makes measuring a cinch. The brown sugar kept clumping, so I had to use my fingers to break them up.

Reserve 3/4 cup of the mixture for the topping later. Put the rest of the mixture into the pan and press into an even layer. You can use your fingers and a measuring cup to flatten it. Bake until it is light golden brown, about 8 minutes (mine took 10 minutes). Let cool on wire rack for one hour.

Filling

  • 1/4 cup flour (1.25 oz)
  • 1/4 cup packed light brown sugar (1.75 oz)
  • 2 teaspoons instant coffee powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1.5 cups chocolate, chopped (9 oz)
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 egg

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.

Melt the chocolate and butter together, stirring. (Mine actually seized up a bit at this step, but the next step fixed it). Let the chocolate cool slightly then whisk an egg into it.

While it is melting, you can whisk together the flour, brown sugar, coffee powder, and salt.

After you whisked the egg into the chocolate, now you can stir in the flour mixture. Spread the filling over the crust (an offset spatula does this really well).

Sprinkle with the reserved oat mixture.

Bake about 25 minutes until a toothpick comes out with just a few moist crumbs and the edges begin to pull away from the sides.

Let the pan cool for about 2 hours on a wire rack. They are really soft even after they’ve cooled.

 

Oatmeal Fudge Bars without the pictures

Crust/Topping

  • 1 cup oats (quick-cooking or old-fashioned) (3 oz)
  • 1 cup packed light brown sugar (7 oz)
  • 3/4 cup flour (3.75 oz)
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 8 tablespoons butter, melted and cooled

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Line 8-inch square baking pan with foil and grease it.

Whisk everything but the butter together in a bowl. Stir in the melted butter until combined. Reserve 3/4 cup of the mixture for the topping later. Put the rest of the mixture into the pan and press into an even layer. You can use your fingers and a measuring cup to flatten it. Bake until it is light golden brown, about 8 minutes (mine took 10 minutes). Let cool on wire rack for one hour.

Filling

  • 1/4 cup flour (1.25 oz)
  • 1/4 cup packed light brown sugar (1.75 oz)
  • 2 teaspoons instant coffee powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1.5 cups chocolate, chopped (9 oz)
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 egg

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.

Melt the chocolate and butter together, stirring. (Mine actually seized up a bit at this step, but the next step fixed it). Let the chocolate cool slightly then whisk an egg into it. While it is melting, you can whisk together the flour, brown sugar, coffee powder, and salt. After you whisked the egg into the chocolate, now you can stir in the flour mixture.

Spread the filling over the crust. Sprinkle with the reserved oat mixture. Bake about 25 minutes until a toothpick comes out with just a few moist crumbs and the edges begin to pull away from the sides.

Let the pan cool for about 2 hours on a wire rack. They are really soft even after they’ve cooled.

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7 thoughts on “Oatmeal Fudge Bars

  1. I have a special affinity for these! When I worked at Starbucks and was an emaciated poor college student they were always my pastry of choice. So rich and yes…. chocoooolaaaateeeee… :Q Looks like yours turned out softer/chewier than my white chocolate ones, I bow down to the master! I love that pic of the dry ingredients in the green mixing bowl!

    Also, the foil tip… DUDE!!!! Mind = blown. Haha I can’t believe I hadn’t read that before, thanks for sharing!

    • I still think yours were soft and chewy. Did you use old-fashioned oats? I did, so maybe that would be a difference? And aren’t you the master since I made it after you did it so well the first time? 😀

      Thank you, Ms. Awesome!

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  4. I just made these today, and as always, Cook’s Country is putting out only reliable and delicious recipes! We thought that these were great. I did sort of underbake the brownie very slightly, and after they set up for 1-2 hours they were fully baked but mmmmm chewy. I won’t personally make them again, but that’s because I’m such an avid baker that they have to be in my top 10% to repeat. For me, I just think that the brownie covers up most of the streusel taste, and when I could taste it (it was delicious!), I still prefer it with fruit flavors or coffee cake anyways. My husband also pronounced them “great” but not a repeat. I just searched my recipes and sure enough I have NO repeat recipes that use chocolate and oats together except for the Banana Crunch Cake (King arthur flour whole grain baking) where banana and the spices are the predominant flavors). Hey, we all have our own favorite dessert combinations that call to us the loudest! But for anyone who likes the idea of chocolate and streusel, this is a really delicious recipe!!! In fact I will mention it to anyone who likes the Starbucks version! The brownie itself is fantastic, the streusel is good, and it’s a unique combination. I’m glad that I tried them 🙂 These are seriously good if you’re into these flavors.

    • Aww. Too bad they aren’t a repeat for you. I can say that a cake with banana in the name doesn’t sound like one I would make unless requested. Banana is not one of my favorite cooking ingredients. 🙂 Thanks for stopping by and sharing!

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